Testimonial: Proudly at Pride

Proudly at Pride

Written by Ashley “ShortShady”

If you know me, you know I’m not much of a morning person, but Saturday morning came and I was ready to go! The day started with a pre-pride brunch lead by the fabulous AccessAI team and Boston City Counselor Michelle Wu. AccessAI, a local pilot program which allows for Aira access throughout our transit system, also allowed for free usage throughout pride, and I, like many others, gathered to connect with and support this strong team. Located near the start of the march, we all decked out with swag, enjoying breakfast sandwiches and copious amounts of coffee before snapping a few photos and setting out for Boston Pride.

Here, I used that same Aira program to grab a train and make for City Hall where the marchers would finish. Although I had never used the program and am not familiar with the train system, this success was invigorating and empowering; the perfect setup for the perfect pride mindset. At city hall plaza, music was pumping and people were everywhere! The energy was contagious, with friendly strangers aproaching, chatting and even describing some of the festival that surrounded us from what enders were where to the various creative outfits worn by celebratory participants. Finally, an announcement was made to find a spot to stand out of the parade route in preparation for the countless marchers to come through.

Standing in a crowd of eager cheerers, I loaded Aira again. This time, I was ready for descriptions of the people marching by. Excitement grew as they aproached, with people all around clapping and chanting and yelling! Finally the groups came one by one, with banners and flags, brightly colored clothing, streamers and all sorts of decorative creations. The groups spanned all ages and capabilities; children, grandparents, people in wheelchairs, on bikes, of all ethnicities and even with pets. Some played or performed music as they passed, while others handed out strings of colored beads, flags or fans for the summer heat. With every group that went, we clapped, cheered, and waved, calling out the words on their signs or simply, “Happy pride!”

When it was over, the plaza was teaming with marchers and watchers alike, returning to its social upbeat atmosphere. All around were people moving to nearby shops or festival events. For me, it was time for another cup of coffee in a local coffee shop where I again chatted with the various attendees that filled the space. Then, it was off for some much-desired dinner and finally to make my way home.

My first pride experience was inspiring and uplifting, showing me the strength of the local LGBT community and those beyond. We are people of all backgrounds, and we are proud to be the uniquely diverse individuals we are. The world in which we live is a mostly safe and accepting one, but there is still plenty of work to be done and that extends far beyond an event which occurs one day a year. Experiencing this year’s pride has given me the motivation to be even more active and outspoken in our fight for understanding, equal and safe conditions. Yes, I’m proud to have been part of Boston Pride, and will most certainly be back next year.